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Telehealth is Growing Exponentially – PSN Rheumatology Site Goes Live

Becker’s Hospital Review recently reported a study of 29 billion private healthcare claims showed provider-to-patient telehealth use increased 1393% between 2014 and 2018. (Fair Health, 2018).

There are many creative ways in which telehealth is being used to improve access to healthcare services and information. Here are a few examples:

  •  A New York nursing school developed a telehealth training program for nurses located in rural areas
  • A West Virginia Hospital has launched a telehealth program for diabetic patients
  • A North Dakota organization has launched therapy telehealth services for child abuse victims
  • A North Carolina healthcare system allows patients to sign into its electronic healthcare record and engage in a telehealth encounter with selected primary care and specialty care providers
  • A Pennsylvania medical center has a telehealth connection with 13 smaller hospitals seeking to improve care for patients with infectious diseases
  • An Indiana hospital offers virtual care visits to local elementary school students for treatment of various conditions including colds and eye issues

These telehealth programs serve as examples of the myriad ways in which technology can be used to improve the health and well-being of a community.

We are pleased to announce the recent implementation of a PSN rheumatology telehealth clinic. The client is a small, rural Kansas hospital. The circumstances surrounding it are part of the beauty of the story. A highly respected, well liked and productive rheumatologist is forced to leave due to relocation  to another state with her spouse. Rather than close the clinic or go through the lengthy process of finding her replacement, the hospital will continue to provide rheumatology services through a telehealth connection with the doctor. The patients will get the care they need from a physician they know and trust.

Although rural folks often prefer face to face encounters with their practitioners, telehealth is a valid solution to access to care issues in rural areas. Mr. Gordon Alloway is the PSN expert on telehealth. He is a former President of the Kansas Telehealth Network. If you have any telehealth questions, he can be contacted at gordon.alloway@psnmo.net.

Rheumatology Association of Iowa (RAI) 5th Annual Meeting

Rheumatology Association of Iowa

Rheumatology Association of Iowa

Friday – Saturday, March 1 – 2, 2019

Quick Conference Information

Registration/Information Desk Hours

Location:Student Common Area
Friday, March 1, 20193:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Saturday, March 2, 20197:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall Hours

Location:Student Common Area
Friday, March 1, 20195:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Saturday, March 2, 20198:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Online registration will be open through February 19, 2019.
After this date, on-site registration will be available.

Registration Includes

  • Entrance to all sessions
  • Program Materials
  • Welcome Reception
  • Continental Breakfast / Breaks / Lunch

Cancellation/Refunds

Registration refund requests must be submitted in writing to the RAI Executive Office no later than 2/7/2019. All refund requests will be subject to a $5.00 processing fee. No refunds will be made after 2/7/2019.

Special Considerations

For accommodations on the basis of disability or special dietary needs, please call (847) 517-7225.

Program Schedule Information

Educational Needs

Effective management in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV), specifically Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (GPA) and Microscopic Polyangiitis (MPA) include not only the use of evidence-based treatments but also rigorous application of monitoring and preventive strategies to reduce the risk of infection and medication-specific toxicities. Rheumatologists need to be aware of these strategies to provide their patients with the best outcomes.

For the two main forms of Large-vessel vasculitis (LVV), Giant Cell Arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu Arteritis (TAK), non-medical management should be considered for disease that is threatening a critical organ or for significant symptoms impacting quality of life.

Today’s challenging health care environment is affecting the way physicians manage their practices, interfering with access to care and forcing them to make difficult decisions. Physicians seek to continue to provide quality care while contending with reduced Medicare reimbursement rates, medical claims, process errors and inefficiency, and legislative and regulatory changes. Rheumatologists need to be aware of emerging trends in practice management, payer reform, and administrative simplification of impact to the success of their practices and quality of patient care.

Educational Objectives

At the conclusion of the RAI 2019 5th Annual Meeting, attendees will be able to:

  1. Recognize federal efforts to improve value in healthcare delivery and payment through programs established under the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA)
  2. Distinguish and contrast pathways for Rheumatologists to be reimbursed under the Quality Payment Program (i.e., the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and Alternative Payment Models (APMs).
  3. Evaluate the potential impact of MACRA on Rheumatology practices and estimate the significance of engagement in current and future value-driven delivery and payment models.
  4. Identify opportunities for state and national advocacy, legislative action and our need for representation at the state national level.
  5. Identify the clinical features of ANCA-associated vasculitis.
  6. Describe the approach to diagnosis for ANCA-associated vasculitis.
  7. List the treatment options for ANCA-associated vasculitis.
  8. Describe the diseases that can be associated with large vessel vasculitis.
  9. Identify the clinical features associated with giant cell arteritis and Takayasu arteritis.
  10. Discuss the treatment approaches to giant cell arteritis and Takayasu arteritis.

The Rheumatology Association of Iowa (RAI) 5th Annual Meeting will be held during March 1 – 2, 2019  at The Hotel at Kirkwood Center, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, United States of America. All sessions will be located in Amphitheater unless otherwise noted. Speakers & times are subject to change

FRIDAY, MARCH 01, 2019

3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Registration/Information Desk
Location: Student Common Area

5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Exhibit Hall Open
Location: Student Common Area

6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Welcome Reception in Exhibit Hall

GENERAL SESSION

5:00 p.m. – 5:05 p.m. Welcome & Opening Remarks
RAI President: Michael S. Brooks, MD, FACP, FACR

5:05 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. How Current Iowa Laws Passed Affect those Practicing Rheumatology Today
Speaker: Doug Ommen
Iowa Insurance Division

5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Exhibit Hall Open
Location: Student Common Area

SATURDAY, MARCH 02, 2019

7:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Registration/Information Desk
Location: Student Common Area

8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Exhibit Hall Open
Location: Student Common Area

8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Practice Management Networking Breakfast
Location: H Classroom 185

8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast in Exhibit Hall
Location: Exhibit Hall

GENERAL SESSION

9:00 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. Welcome & Announcements

9:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Keynote Lecture I Vasculitis
Speaker: Carol A. Langford, MD, MHS, FACP
Cleveland Clinic Foundation

10:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. Break/Visit Exhibits

10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Keynote Lecture II Vasculitis
Speaker: Carol A. Langford, MD, MHS, FACP
Cleveland Clinic Foundation

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. RAI Annual Business Meeting
Location: Amphitheater

12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Industry Satellite Symposia Lunch
Location: Conference Room 185

1:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Dessert & Networking in Exhibit Hall

2:00 p.m. – – 4:00 p.m. Advocacy Panel/Presentations
CSRO State Issues
ACR Federal Issues
Arthritis Foundation
Iowa Medical Society

Continuing Education Credit

Iowa Medical Society

  • DO: Des Moines University (DMU) is accredited by the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) to provide osteopathic continuing medical education for physicians. DMU designates this program for a maximum of 5.0 AOA Category 2-A credits and will report CME and specialty credits commensurate with the extent of the physician’s participation in this activity.
  • MD: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Iowa Medical Society (IMS) through the joint providership of Des Moines University (DMU) and the Rheumatology Association of Iowa. DMU is accredited by IMS to provide continuing medical education for physicians. DMU designates this live activity for a maximum of 5.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
  • Nurse: Des Moines University is Iowa Board of Nursing approved provider #112. This live activity has been reviewed and approved for 5.0 continuing education contact hour(s). No partial credit awarded.
  • Other: This live activity is designated for 5.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™.

General Disclaimer

The statements and opinions contained in this program are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the Rheumatology Association of Iowa or Des Moines University (DMU). The appearance of the advertisements is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality, or safety. Everyone in a position to control the content of this educational activity will disclose to the CME provider and to attendees all relevant financial relationships with any commercial interest. The content of this publication may contain discussion of off-label uses of some of the agents mentioned. Please consult the prescribing information for full disclosure of approved uses. RAI disclaims responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas or products referred to in the abstracts or advertisements.

Special Assistance

We encourage participation by all individuals. If you have a disability, advance notification of any special needs will help us better serve you. Call (847) 517-7225 if you require special assistance to fully participate in the meeting.

Educational Grants

No commercial interest company provided financial support for this continuing education activity.

Better Bone Heath with Probiotics?

Osteoporosis: Could probiotics protect bone health?

Osteoporosis predominantly affects older adults, but bone loss can start at as early as age 40. Recently, scientists have found that probiotics might be a safe and effective tool to help fight bone loss.

Bones do not just grow once and then stay the same for life. Instead, bone is made up of living tissue that is constantly being broken and remodeled into new bone.

This process is more efficient when we are young. By around age 30, the body stops increasing bone mass, and once we reach our 40s and 50s, more bone might be being broken down than we are replacing.

Over time, this can result in osteoporosis. Bones gradually become thinner, which can lead to fractures — even from a simple fall.

Older women tend to have a higher risk of developing the disease, but it is not exclusive to women; it can affect men as well.

Other risk factors may include breaking a bone after the age of 50, experiencing early menopause, having a smaller body frame, smoking tobacco, and having a family history of osteoporosis.

Fractures can have severe consequences; for instance, during the first year after a hip fracture, mortality rates are 24–30 percent due to the risk of complications.

Osteoporosis becomes more of an issue the older we get, and women tend to lose bone mass quickly during menopause. Regardless, by the time that people are in their 70s, both men and women lose bone mass at around the same rate.

Medications are available that can help treat osteoporosis, but preventing or slowing the initial bone loss would be a vast improvement.

Preventing osteoporosis?

A recent study, published in the journal Immunity, tested the ability of a probiotic to enhance bone growth.

The researchers, led by senior study author Roberto Pacifici — of Emory University in Atlanta, GA — tackled this topic with female laboratory mice. The scientists gave them oral Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supplementation for a period over 4 weeks.

The team revealed that the probiotic stimulated the growth of gut bacteria that produce a particular metabolite called butyrate. Butyrate, in turn, prompted T cells in bone marrow to produce a protein called Wnt10b, which is vital for bone growth.

“We were surprised by the potency of the gut microbiome in regulating bone and by the complexity of the mechanism of action of probiotics.”

Roberto Pacifici

He explains that probiotics are somewhat controversial, claiming, “Because their mechanism of action in bone is unknown, they are regarded as some kind of alternative, esoteric, unproven treatment.”

However, the research shows that they can affect bone structure in a positive way. Pacifici also believes that the number of bacteria contained in the probiotics may be as important as the probiotic that is used, but more research is needed to confirm this.

FULL ARTICLE >>>> SOURCE: Medical News Today

SLRA Presentation & Dinner – September 2018

St. Louis University School of Medicine

St. Louis Rheumatology Association

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

Drug Pricing; How did we get here and where are we going?

Presenter: Steve Miller, MD, MBA, Senior Vice President & Chief Medical Officer, Express Scripts

Steve Miller, MD, MBASteve Miller has served as Chief Medical Officer at Express Scripts since 2006, focusing on supporting government relations, leading the Pharmacy & Therapeutics committee, managing the Medical Affairs team and interfacing with client groups.

He received his medical degree from the University of Missouri-Kansas City, and he trained in the Pathology and Research fellowship at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

He degrees in Internal Medicine which he recieved at the University of Colorado, Nephrology at Washington University, and did a cardiology research fellowship at University of California-San Francisco. Miller earned his MBA at Olin.

Dr. Steve Miller’s expertise represents years as a  medical researcher, clinician and administrator, and spans numerous healthcare  subjects. Since joining the company in 2005, Dr. Miller has represented Express Scripts as a presenter at nationwide conferences.

At Express Scripts, he is actively involved in developing their clinical programs and advancing the use of generic pharmaceuticals and  specialty medications. Dr. Miller is a leader in the promotion of legislation to create a pathway at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the regulation of biogenerics and biosimilars.

Prior to joining Express Scripts, Dr. Miller was the vice president and chief  medical officer at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Washington University School of  Medicine in St. Louis.

6:15 – 7:00 pm Registration

7:00 – 9:00 pm Presentation and dinner

Herbie’s

This live activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Washington University School of Medicine, Continuing Medical Education and St. Louis Rheumatology Association.  Washington University is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.  Washington University designates this live activity for a maximum of _1_ AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

It is the policy of Washington University School of Medicine, Continuing Medical Education, to ensure balance, independence, objectivity and scientific rigor in all its educational activities.  All planners, faculty and other persons who may influence content of this CME activity have disclosed all relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. All disclosures have been reported and are indicated with their presentations.  Any potential conflicts were addressed and resolved.  All members of the CME department have nothing to disclose.  Speakers are also expected to openly disclose inclusion of discussion of any off-label, experimental, or investigational use of drugs or devices in their presentations.

Presentations are expected to be based on evidence that is accepted within the profession of medicine as adequate justification for their indication in the care of patients.  All scientific research should conform to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection and analysis. These presentations are not an endorsement of any commercial interests. These presentations are the views and experiences of the presenters.  The presenters’ views do not represent the policy or position of Washington University School of Medicine.  Washington University School of Medicine, Continuing Medical Education, is the sponsor for CME credits.

Arthritis Brochures for Rheumatologists

We help lead the fight for the rheumatoid arthritis community and help you to assist your patients in conquering their everyday battles with rheumatoid arthritis through life-changing information and resources, access to optimal care, advancements in science and community connections.

Below, find out how you can access, and download free brochures from the Arthritis Foundation on OA, RA, Fibro and Biologics.

  • Register your free AF Store account at https://www.afstore.org/
  • Hover over Brochures, located on the left side of the page.
  • Click the second option, Free Downloadable Brochures.
  • Here you will see the Fibro, RA, OA, and Biologic/Biosimilar handouts.
  • Enter quantity “1”.
  • Add to cart and click Checkout.
  • You will need to submit a credit card number but your total will remain zero dollars.
  • Click Place Order. You will receive a confirmation email for your purchase but your purchase will be zero.
  • Click My Account on the top of your page.
  • Scroll down to Order History.
  • Click the date of your order (may be in blue print)
  • Click the red PDF of the brochure you ordered which will give you access to print the document.

More brochures will be added as the Arthritis Foundation’s goal is to transfer all of their brochures to electronic versions.

Review of NSAID Cardiovascular Toxicity

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most used drugs for acute and chronic pain. More than 30 billion doses of NSAIDs are consumed annually from more than 70 million prescriptions.

Despite their common use, NSAIDs are not free of serious toxicities. In the pre-Vioxx (rofecoxib) era, gastrointestinal toxicity was the primary concern for many NSAIDs. In 1999, Wolfe et al. demonstrated the increasing rate of hospital admissions due to NSAID toxicity, thought mostly to be due to gastrointestinal (GI) side effects

This led to the development and use of selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX‑2) inhibitors, the first of which was celecoxib, released in 1998, followed soon by rofecoxib in 1999 and several others.4,5 These agents had no effect on COX-1, an enzyme responsible for production of cytoprotective prostaglandin E2 and I2 in the stomach and, hence, had reduced risk of GI side effects.

An exponential rise in the use of these drugs occurred.5 Simultaneously, strong evidence demonstrating that many of these agents confer a risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and other cardiovascular events developed.

The Mechanism of NSAID Cardiovascular Risk

The relation of MI risk and COX-2 inhibition is most noted in a study conducted by Garcia-Rodriguez et al.7 They noted a direct correlation between MI risk and the degree of COX-2 over COX-1 inhibition. The exact mechanism of COX-2 inhibition remains unknown, but the hypothesis of an imbalance between thromboxane

A2 (which promotes platelet aggregation and acts as a vasoconstrictor) and prostacyclin (an inhibitor of platelet aggregation and a vasodilator), produced by both platelets and endothelial cells, has gained the most prominence.8-10

Similarly, it has been postulated that reduced prostaglandin synthesis due to NSAID use augments the Th-1 mediated immune response, which leads to increased proatherogenic cytokines. This ultimately leads to detrimental plaque remodeling, rupture and embolization of plaque.11

Researchers think the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis increases peripheral vascular resistance and reduces renal perfusion, glomerular filtration and sodium excretion, which would ultimately lead to fluid retention and further contribute to the cardio­vascular toxicity.11

More than 88,000 Americans suffered myocardial infarction due to rofecoxib, & more than 38,000 died.

READ MORE >>>> SOURCE: The Rheumatologist

Rheumatologist joins PSN in Kentucky

PSN Welcomes Dr. Cara Hammonds to the Rheumatology Team

Premier Specialty Network is proud to announce that we have expanded our presence and service in Kentucky with the additions of Benton, Kentucky based Rheumatologist, Dr. Cara Hammonds to the PSN Team.

By extending our reach into new territory at Marshall County Hospital, in Benton as well as Crittenden Health System in Marion, PSN is helping to bring much needed rheumatology services to an undeserved area.

Dr. Hammonds is originally from western Kentucky.  She graduated from the University of Louisville School of Medicine in 2005. She completed specialty training in Internal Medicine at the University of Cincinnati and Rheumatology at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.  Dr. Hammonds is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

She is a member of the American College of Rheumatology.

Dr. Hammonds specializes in the treatment of pain from Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, Fibromyalgia, and Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA).

When Should I See a Rheumatologist?

If you think you have a rheumatic disease, call to make an appointment. The sooner you get diagnosed and begin treatment, the sooner you will feel better. We are here to help you through your journey.

Rheumatological Conditions

Comprehensive care is provided for patients with a wide variety of complex rheumatic diseases, including Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, Osteoporosis, Psoriatic Arthritis, Lupus, Vasculitis, Polymyositis, Sjogren’s Syndrome, Polymyalgia Rheumatica, Temporal Arteritis, Fibromyalgia, Gout and Pseudogout, Dermatomyositis, Behcet’s disease, Ankylosing Spondylitis, Scleroderma, Mixed Connective Tissue Disease, and Granulomatous Polyangiitis.

2018 Walk to Cure Arthritis – Southern Illinois

St. Louis University School of Medicine

2018 Walk to Cure Arthritis – Southern Illinois

Saturday, April 21st, 2018

Walk to Cure Arthritis

Everyone knows someone with arthritis. It affects more than 50 million Americans, including 300,000 children. People with arthritis are warriors – they face relentless pain, a frustrating search for a diagnosis, multiple doctor’s visits and treatment, missed work and school, limited mobility, a maze of medical and insurance paperwork, and the desire to live a full life without the limitations that arthritis creates.

The Walk to Cure Arthritis is the largest gathering of the arthritis community in the world, raising funds for research, resources, better treatments and a cure.  More than just a walk event, it’s something even bigger than arthritis itself.

ONE Can Make a Difference

Arthritis is tough, but we are even tougher – especially when we all come together for the largest arthritis gathering in the world!

The Arthritis Foundation’s Walk to Cure Arthritis is where we become ONE, rising up to fight this life-altering disease even harder. Where we join hand in hand to celebrate arthritis warriors and raise crucial funds for innovative research, resources and a cure.

One in every four Americans has arthritis, making it the nation’s leading cause of disability. Two-thirds of those affected are under age 65, including 300,000 children. Arthritis is painful, debilitating and diminishes quality of life. But every day we’re making more headway through scientific discoveries that bring us closer to a cure.

Whether you’re an arthritis warrior yourself or care about someone who is, sign up and WALK to CURE Arthritis.

SLRA Presentation & Dinner – March 2018

Saint Louis University School of Medicine

St. Louis Rheumatology Association

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Jeffrey A. Sparks, MD, MMSc

CME: Update on the Studies to Evaluate the Etiology and Public Health Burden of Rheumatic Diseases

Jeffrey A. Sparks, MD, MMSc -Division of Rheumatology/Immunology & Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Sparks is a rheumatologist and population scientist with an overall focus on using patient-oriented and epidemiologic research studies to evaluate the etiology, outcomes, and public health burden of rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In particular, he performs studies to evaluate the genetic, environmental, serologic, and familial risk factors for RA, clinical trials for RA prevention, RA outcomes research focusing on the respiratory burden of RA, evaluates metabolic factors such as weight loss for RA outcomes, and investigates rheumatic manifestations of osseous sarcoidosis.

6:30 – 7:30 pm Registration

7:30 – 9:00 pm Presentation and dinner

Nieman Marcus, Zodiac Room, Hwy 40 and

Lindbergh

REGISTER FOR CME

This live activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Washington University School of Medicine, Continuing Medical Education and St. Louis Rheumatology Association.  Washington University is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.  Washington University designates this live activity for a maximum of _1_ AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

It is the policy of Washington University School of Medicine, Continuing Medical Education, to ensure balance, independence, objectivity and scientific rigor in all its educational activities.  All planners, faculty and other persons who may influence content of this CME activity have disclosed all relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. All disclosures have been reported and are indicated with their presentations.  Any potential conflicts were addressed and resolved.

 All members of the CME department have nothing to disclose.  Speakers are also expected to openly disclose inclusion of discussion of any off-label, experimental, or investigational use of drugs or devices in their presentations. Presentations are expected to be based on evidence that is accepted within the profession of medicine as adequate justification for their indication in the care of patients.  All scientific research should conform to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection and analysis.

These presentations are not an endorsement of any commercial interests. These presentations are the views and experiences of the presenters.  The presenters’ views do not represent the policy or position of Washington University School of Medicine.  Washington University School of Medicine, Continuing Medical Education, is the sponsor for CME credits.

Rheumatology Association of Iowa 4th Annual Meeting 2018 (RAI 2018)

Rheumatology Association of Iowa

Rheumatology Association of Iowa

The Rheumatology Association of Iowa (RAI) 4th Annual Meeting will be held during Feb 23 – 24, 2018 at The Hotel at Kirkwood Center, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, United States of America.

Registration/Information Desk Hours

Location: Student Common Area
Friday, February 23, 20183:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Saturday, February 24, 20187:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall Hours

Location: Student Common Area
Friday, February 23, 20184:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Saturday, February 24, 20188:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Additional Registration Information

Registration Fee Includes:

  • Entrance to all sessions
  • Program Materials
  • Welcome Reception
  • Continental Breakfast / Breaks / Lunch

Special Needs

For accommodations on the basis of disability or special dietary needs, please call (847) 517-7225.

Questions

Contact the RAI Executive Office by:
Phone: (847) 517-7225
Fax: (847) 517-7229
Email: rai@wjweiser.com

EVENT REGISTRATION

Today’s challenging health care environment is affecting the way physicians manage their practices, interfering with access to care and forcing them to make difficult decisions. Physicians seek to continue to provide quality care while contending with reduced Medicare reimbursement rates, medical claims, process errors and inefficiency, and legislative and regulatory changes. Rheumatologists need to be aware of emerging trends in practice management, payer reform, and administrative simplification of impact to the success of their practices and quality of patient care.

Rheumatologists and their patients will be significantly impacted by the implementation of MACRA, thus education and training on the resultant programs are important to ensure practice viability and compliance with the new requirements. Absent such education, rheumatology practices are more likely to absorb steep financial penalties and fail to comply with new statutory and regulatory mandates, which could subsequently result in the closure of rheumatology practices and loss of beneficiary access to important rheumatology care.